Welcome to Lawtext Publishing Limited

Legal information specialists - welcome to our web page - you can order and pay for books and subscriptions through this site

LAWTEXT PUBLISHING LIMITED

Lawtext is based in Oxfordshire and has a growing list of specialist journals, law reports and books. These provide a range of information services for lawyers, researchers and advisors practising in the following areas


Our peer-reviewed journals provide a mix of opinion, analysis and commentary with updates of recent cases and regulatory developments. Each title reviews and analyses legal developments within its sector with particular emphasis on forthcoming changes at national, EU and international levels.

Focus is placed on the complex interplay between commercial realities and the current legal regimes, enabling advisors/readers to be aware of new potential liabilities and risks and the influence of court decisions from across the world.

Notice 
Current Subscribers to Journal of International Maritime Law
If you have not received your copy via postal services the issue is available as a pdf via our web page please email ltp@lawtext.com for password details.   

Highlights
Journal of International Maritime Law - Volume 27 Issue 1

EDITORIAL

Jason Chuah  Stranded seafarers – a year of shameful treatment

ARTICLES

Aurora Villacellino Conflict of laws: recognition (or not) of foreign maritime liens  – the lex causae approach (Canada, USA), the lex fori approach (England, South Africa), Australia and the Sam Hawk, and a possible solution (Singapore and others)?

Erik Røsæg  The Paris Agreement on climate change  – shipping and aviation exemptions – why? – the IMO and ICAO  approaches to controlling GHG emissions

Måns Jacobsson  Compensation for pure economic loss resulting from tanker oil spills (part II) - (part I published in Volume 26 Issue 6)

Autonomous ships and the law  – new book reviewed by Andrew Tettenborn

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN LAW

CALL FOR PAPERS:

2 special issues: Access to maternity services and care during Covid-19  and  Children’s consent to treatment: Time for a new approach?

 Access to maternity services and care during Covid-19:

 The Covid-19 crisis has impacted healthcare in a myriad of ways, forcing us to rethink how issues such as resources, access to routine services, and measures to protect public health interact with the law.  In this call for papers, we are seeking articles that consider legal issues related to access to maternity services/care during the pandemic. According to the World Health Organization, adequate maternity care includes antenatal care (e.g. access to abortion, access to check-ups during the pregnancy); delivery care (e.g. access to emergency obstetric services); and postpartum care (e.g. access to services detecting and treating infection or postpartum depression). Considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternity services more broadly (e.g. separation of mothers and newborns in hospital, access to surrogacy services, access to fertility services), we encourage authors to view this topic broadly, in all its complexity.

 

 

Children’s consent to treatment: Time for a new approach? Puberty blockers, gender identity services, and children’s consent.

 In this call for papers, we are seeking articles that consider the recent High Court decision Bell & Anor v The Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust [2020] EWHC 3274 (Admin). In this decision, the High Court decided that children under 16 were unlikely to be sufficiently competent to provide consent towards the use of puberty blocking medication, however, it impacts our understanding of children’s consent to treatment in a wider context. As such, we welcome papers that consider the implications of the High Court’s decision, as well as papers that look more broadly at children’s consent to treatment.

The deadline for papers is 30th June 2021. 10,000 words maximum (excluding footnotes).

Please email submissions to cil@lawtext.co.uk For the attention of Dr Lougarre and Dr Hammond-Browning



 Access to maternity services and care during Covid-19:

 

The Covid-19 crisis has impacted healthcare in a myriad of ways, forcing us to rethink how issues such as resources, access to routine services, and measures to protect public health interact with the law.  In this call for papers, we are seeking articles that consider legal issues related to access to maternity services/care during the pandemic. According to the World Health Organization, adequate maternity care includes antenatal care (e.g. access to abortion, access to check-ups during the pregnancy); delivery care (e.g. access to emergency obstetric services); and postpartum care (e.g. access to services detecting and treating infection or postpartum depression). Considering the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on maternity services more broadly (e.g. separation of mothers and newborns in hospital, access to surrogacy services, access to fertility services), we encourage authors to view this topic broadly, in all its complexity.

 

 

Children’s consent to treatment: Time for a new approach? Puberty blockers, gender identity services, and children’s consent.

 

In this call for papers, we are seeking articles that consider the recent High Court decision Bell & Anor v The Tavistock and Portman NHS Trust [2020] EWHC 3274 (Admin). In this decision, the High Court decided that children under 16 were unlikely to be sufficiently competent to provide consent towards the use of puberty blocking medication, however, it impacts our understanding of children’s consent to treatment in a wider context. As such, we welcome papers that consider the implications of the High Court’s decision, as well as papers that look more broadly at children’s consent to treatment.

 

 

The deadline for papers is 30th June 2020. 10,000 words maximum (excluding footnotes).

Please email submissions to cil@lawtext.co.uk For the attention of Dr Lougarre and Dr Hammond-Browning


The Contaminated Blood Scandal

In the 1970s and 1980s, thousands of people with haemophilia were infected with Hepatitis C and the HIV virus after receiving contaminated blood products through the NHS. Patients were given products that had been imported from the United States, where paid donors included individuals from high-risk groups. A public inquiry into the contaminated blood scandal commenced in April 2019, and is expected to hear evidence from affected patients, families, healthcare professionals and other experts.

The Editors of Contemporary Issues in Law invite submissions that explore the topic of the contaminated blood inquiry. These can draw on any related legal or ethical aspect (for example, criminal negligence, compensation, liability).

Papers should be 8,000-10,000 words (including footnotes)

Submission deadline: Ongoing

Submissions should be emailed to cil@lawtext.com